Housetrucks: The Artistic Tiny Homes on Wheels

Housetruck with a porch.
Housetruck with a porch.

If you have been following this blog for a while, you are probably already aware of my fascination with unusual homes, especially ones that are mobile.

I spent over a year living on a 28-foot sailboat immediately after graduating from college.  My boat-home was a compromise with my parents who protested the purchase of a VW Westfalia and the mobile lifestyle that would invariably ensue.

On the boat, I had the bookshelves above my bed lined with poetry by T.S. Eliot and novels by Virginia Woolf, and the tiny closet filled with Audrey Hepburn black dresses. My pour-over coffee setup in the kitchen made the muddiest boat coffee you can imagine. It was an adventure. And every time I catch of glimpse of others living in interesting homes, I breathe a nostalgic sigh.

A while back, I wrote a post about the adventurous lifestyles of the #vanlife folks of Instagram.  Imagine my delight at discovering these photos of the #vanlife OGs.  The housetruckers!

This movement gained some footing with the hippies of the San Francisco Bay Area, though it really flourished with their counterculture counterparts in New Zealand.  The 1970s Kiwi housetrucks were built using recycled materials from the colonial structures that were being torn down during the era.  Some even utilized the shipping crates in which their trucks arrived on the island in order to construct their homes.

Because of the high-quality timber used by some housetruckers, some of these mobile homes are truly works of art.

 

Blue painted housetruck. This hippie home on wheels was part of the counterculture movement in New Zealand.
Painted Housetruck (photo courtesy of Nambassa Trust and Peter Terry)

 

Housetruck with Craftsman style windows.
Housetruck with Craftsman style windows.

 

New Zealand housetruck made using a shipping crate.
New Zealand housetruck made using a shipping crate.

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Check out the Instagram hashtag #housetrucks for some modern-day housetruck gems!

To read more about these funky homes-on-wheels, check out this interview with modern housetrucker Roger Beck.

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